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Importance and Symbols of Ghana Stools

Traditional stools carved from wood hold symbolic importance in governance. Historically used by chiefs and kings, they still signify authority in modern Ghana. The state house, Golden Jubilee House, is stool-shaped, depicting unity in diversity with the “Funtunfunefu” symbol. This symbolizes Ghana’s history and diverse ideas converging for a unified nation, making it significant in Ghana’s governance system.

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Ghana | Accra

Recycling and Upcycling products

60% of the products sold are upcycled and recycled.

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Ghana | Accra

Eco-Friendly Creations

Explore our diverse range of sustainable products at our Recycled Products section. From reversible beanies to eco-friendly coconut shell water bottles, African black soap, and innovative creations crafted from water hyacinth, discover eco-conscious choices with unique designs.

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Ghana | Accra

Making African Drums

The creation of traditional Ghanaian drums involves a journey from deep forests to Accra, where artisans shape wood, add intricate designs, and attach animal skins. These drums convey cultural messages and provide entertainment.

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Ghana | Accra

Playing the African Drums

Hear the sound of traditional african drums right after they are made.

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Ghana | Accra

Making an African Drum in 360

360 footage of traditional African drum making.

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Ghana | Accra

Making Mats

The process of making mats in Adan involves drying grass, dyeing it with hot water and colors, and weaving it into mats using a platform and ropes. This craft serves as a source of income for many in the community, with items sold at local markets and transported via the Volta River.

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Ghana | Ada

Basket Weaving

On Pediatokope, one of the largest islands in Ada, basket weaving is a significant economic activity alongside fishing. They use palm straw harvested from the forest. After splitting it into two sections, the bottom is used for the basket’s base, while the top is for weaving. The process involves drying the straw, measuring it based on the desired basket size, and creating the base. A team of skilled individuals works on different aspects of basket making.

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Ghana | Ada

Mixing the Mud and the Sand

To make the clay workable for molding a pot, the pot maker is mixing sand and muddy clay. Through this process, the pot will have less risk of cracking. The use of only muddy clay for molding will not be effective, so sand must be mixed in to increase stability.

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Ghana | Nkawkaw

Sifting the Clay

The pot maker has been in the business for more than 50 years, taking over from her grandparents. The work is essential to support the family’s livelihood. As she works, she sifts the clay to ensure that after mixing it, there will be no cracks in the final product. This is the primary reason for her cleaning the clay.

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Ghana | Nkawkaw

Firing the Pots

The pot makers must be careful not to under or over-burn the pots during the burning stage, as this can cause cracking or breakage. Once they are removed from the fire, the pots are inspected for any deformations, cracks, or imperfections, before they are cleaned and made ready for sale. Despite the time-consuming and challenging process, the pot makers take pride in their work and ensure each pot is of the highest quality.

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Ghana | Nkawkaw

The Mud Used to Produce the Clay

The process of creating clay for making pots involves softening the clay by storing it in water for a few days, making it workable. Without water, the clay is hard and cannot be worked on.

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Ghana | Nkawkaw
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